The Ethical Engagement With the Medicalization of Death in the Catholic Tradition

Gerard Magillmagill%20photo
Vernon F. Gallagher Chair and Professor of Healthcare Ethics, Duquesne University
Thursday, May 5, 7:00 p.m.
Reading Room, Cowles Library
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To engage the medicalization of death & dying ethically, the Catholic Sacramental tradition provides the context for its Natural Law approach. This recognizes both dignity and futility in the dying process and uses double effect reasoning to resolve medicalization-related dilemmas. The presentation discusses a variety of scenarios in end-of-life care including PVS patients, maternal-fetal conflicts, and terminal sedation in palliative care (as a response to assisted suicide).

In 2007 Professor Gerard Magill was appointed as the the Vernon F. Gallagher Chair for the Integration of Science, Theology, Philosophy, and Law at Duquesne University. He is a tenured Professor in Duquesne University’s Center for Healthcare Ethics where he mentors students in its Master’s and Doctoral programs.

Video of the presentation

Embrace Aging: Managing Chronic Diseases

Yogesh ShahDr.%20Y.%20Shah%202013

Geriatric Specialist, Des Moines University

Tuesday, April 26, 7:00 p.m.
Sussman Theater, Olmsted Center, Drake University
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Dr. Shah is a triple board-certified in family medicine and specializes in geriatrics, hospice, and palliative medicine. His primary interest is in early detection of memory problems and supporting families and patients with different forms and at different stages of dementias.
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Moderator: Connie Eastman, AARP Iowa Community Outreach Associate State Director
Connie coordinates AARP’s statewide community serve, advocacy, and educational activities and programs.

Continuing education credit is available for nurses and other healthcare professionals who attend this event. It is approved by Iowa Board of Nursing Provider #302, HCI Care Services for 0.15 CEUs or 1.5 contact hours of continuing education.

Secular Death

Amy Hollywoodhollywoodamy_0
Elizabeth H. Monrad Professor of Christian Studies, Harvard University
Thursday, April 14, 6:00 p.m.
Sussman Theater, Olmsted Center
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Amy Hollywood came to Harvard Divinity School after teaching at Rhodes College, Dartmouth College, and the University of Chicago. She is the author of The Soul as Virgin Wife: Mechthild of Magdeburg, Marguerite Porete, and Meister Eckhart, which received the Otto Grundler Prize for the best book in medieval studies from the International Congress of Medieval Studies.  Professor Hollywood is currently exploring the place of the mystical, often redescribed as enthusiasm, within modern philosophy, theology, and poetry.
Listen to the audio of the presentation below:

Giving Back: Above + Beyond Cancer's 2015 Trip to Nepal

Member of Above + Beyond Cancer’s 2015 mission trip to Kathmanduabc2
Dr. Richard Deming and Jake DeHaai
Thursday, March 24, 7:00 p.m.
Cowles Reading Room, Cowles Library, Drake University
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On September 9, 2015, 23 cancer survivors and caregivers travelled to Kathmandu, Nepal for a week-long medical mission trip as part of the Above + Beyond Cancer Foundation. While at Baktapur Cancer Hospital, they donated medical supplies, built a garden for patients, and shared stories of cancer journeys and surviorship with patients and doctors. During this lecture, Dr. Richard Deming and Jake DeHaai will talk about their experiences on the trip.

Dr. Richard Deming is medical director of Mercy Cancer Center in Des Moines. He is the founder and chairman of the Above + Beyond Cancer Foundation and the Dr. Richard Deming Foundation.

Jake DeHaai is from West Des Moines, Iowa and is a senior at Iowa State studying Political Science, International Relations, and Economics. He was diagnosed with a rare form of bone cancer at the age of 10.

To listen to the audio:

Embrace Aging: Care-Giving

Charles Wurth

Arbor Spring Management Services

Tuesday, March 29, 7:00 p.m.
Sussman Theater, Olmsted Center, Drake University
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In a World of Dementia And Alzheimer’s Disease
Chuck Wurth specializes in care for those with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia. He and his family have worked to redesign dementia care through a holistic program in a home-like setting.
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Moderator: Martha Willits, AARP Iowa State President

Willits is the volunteer Iowa State President of AARP, the nonprofit, nonpartisan organization for 50+ with 370,000 members in Iowa. She was formerly president and CEO of the Greater Des Moines Partnership as well as formerly President and Chief Professional Officer of the United Way of Central Iowa.

Video of the Lecture

Continuing education credit is available for nurses and other healthcare professionals who attend this event. It is approved by Iowa Board of Nursing Provider #302, HCI Care Services for 0.15 CEUs or 1.5 contact hours of continuing education.

Eternal Life, Death, and Dying in Jainism

Christopher ChappleChris Chapple Photo

Navin and Pratima Doshi Professor of Indic and Comparative Theology, Loyola Marymount University

Thursday, March 3, 7:00 p.m.
Sussman Theater, Olmsted Center, Drake University
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The Jain tradition has observed a practice known as Sallekhana or Santhara, through which one willingly foregoes food and hydration toward the end of one’s life in order to pass peacefully into a new life. Chapple will give details about the process and the history of Sallekhana.  He will also explore the correlations of this fast unto death with the hospice and “right to die” movements in contemporary America.
Chapple is a specialist in the religions of India; he has published twenty books on aspects of Yoga, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, as well as religion and ecology.  He serves on the advisory boards of the Ahimsa Center, the Forum on Religion and Ecology, and the International School for Jain Studies.

Embrace Aging: Supporting Our Parents

Joel Olah
Executive Director, Aging Resources of Central Iowa13282

Moderator: Maryalice Larson
AARP Iowa Executive Council

Tuesday, February 23, 7:00 p.m.
Sussman Theater, Olmsted Center, Drake University
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Dr. Olah has been with Aging Resources of Central Iowa for 21 years, managing a comprehensive home and community-based service delivery system for more than 125,000 older adults in central Iowa.

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Larson has a strong background in health services management, and hold a Master of Arts in Mental Health Nursing from the University of Iowa.

Video of the Lecture

Continuing education credit is available for nurses and other healthcare professionals who attend this event. It is approved by Iowa Board of Nursing Provider #302, HCI Care Services for 0.15 CEUs or 1.5 contact hours of continuing education.

Spring Community Interfaith Dialogue

Moderator:Norma Hirsch
  • Norma Hirsch, Professor of Osteopathic Medicine
    at Des Moines University
Panelists:
  • Robert Aubrey, Chaplin (Retired); Unity Point and Broadlawns
  • David Kaufman, Rabbi, Temple B’nai Jeshurun
  • Yogesh Shah, Associate Dean, Des Moines University

Thursday, February 11, 7:00 p.m.
Iles Funeral Homes, Dunn’s Chapel
2121 Grand Ave, Des Moines

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How do the religions of the world understand death and dying? What rituals do they practice as preparation for death and in response to death? What effects has the “medicalization of death” had on these traditional understandings and practices? And what does the medical community need to know about traditional religious theologies and rituals related to death and dying?

The Comparison Project’s Community Interfaith Dialogue will explore these questions from the perspectives of Judaism, Catholicism, and Buddhism. Our moderator and panelists will focus particularly on the tensions between traditional theologies and rituals of death and the way in which death has increasingly become the domain of medicine and law. There will be ample time for questions from the audience.

Continuing education credit is available for nurses and other healthcare professionals who attend this event. It is approved by Iowa Board of Nursing Provider #302, HCI Care Services for 0.15 CEUs or 1.5 contact hours of continuing education.

The video from the panel can be viewed here.

Rabbi_K_clippedAviary Photo_130979741109163158Dr.%20Y.%20Shah%202013

 

Calvin Community: Healthy Aging and Brain Wellness

Robert BenderDr_-Bender-2013
Geriatric/Dementia Specialist, Broadlawns Medical Center

Moderator: Mary Mincer Hansen
Co-Chair, Age Friendly Great Des Moines Health Committee

Tuesday, January 26, 7:00 p.m.
Sussman Theater, Olmsted Center, Drake University
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It’s a commonplace that physical exercise is an important element of healthy aging. What is less well recognized is the benefit of exercising your brain.

According to Dr. Bender, combining physical exercise and cognitive activity along with other factors such as diet, meditation, and medication can help to retard the progression of Alzheimer’s and other dementia related diseases. He notes that modern science has revealed that humans “get new brain cells every day until the day we die.”

Dr. Bender, who has practiced as a geriatrician for more than 30 years, will share what modern medicine has taught about aging well, along with some of the insights he has gained from his work in the Mather Brain Gymnasium at Broadlawns.

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Dr. Mincer Hansen is the former Director of the Iowa Department of Public Health. Dr. Mincer Hansen has served in many national positions and held many roles involving public health.

Continuing education credit is available through HCI Care Services for nurses and other healthcare professionals.

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View the video recording of the event

Fall Interfaith Dialogue

Moderator:Norma Hirsch
  • Norma Hirsch, Professor of Osteopathic Medicine
    at Des Moines University
Panelists:
  • Sayeed Hussain, Pediatrician, West Des Moines Children’s Clinic
  • Pramod Mahajan, Associate Professor of Pharmacology, Drake University
  • You Bin, Fulbright Visiting Scholar of Religion, Minzu University of China
  • Joseph Moravec, Professor of Theology and Philosophy, Mercy College

Thursday, December 3, 7:00 p.m.
Iles Funeral Homes, Dunn’s Chapel
2121 Grand Ave, Des Moines

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How do the religions of the world understand death and dying? What rituals do they practice as preparation for death and in response to death? What effects has the “medicalization of death” had on these traditional understandings and practices? And what does the medical community need to know about traditional religious theologies and rituals related to death and dying?

The Comparison Project’s Community Interfaith Dialogue will explore these questions from the perspectives of Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, and Chinese Religion. Our moderator and panelists will focus particularly on the tensions between traditional theologies and rituals of death and the way in which death has increasingly become the domain of medicine and law. There will be ample time for questions from the audience.

Videos:
Dialogue
Questions

Pramod Mahajan

Joseph MoravecSayeed HussainYouBin